St. Joseph's Parish

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Holy Week

  • Written by Fr. Emmanuel Famiyeh

Holy Week is with us again; we ought to contemplate anew the ineffable goodness of God through the Passion, Death and Resurrection of Jesus Christ.  It is a week to remind us of the true essence and nature of religion: the need to be in-sync with God at all times for our well-being and redemption; otherwise, we accept a life of self-inflicted misery.  Christ gave us the genuine pattern of this religion in relying on and doing the will of God by a life of Total Abandonment and Self-Dedication, even in the face of Death and Persecution.

As we contemplate the events and celebrations of the Holy Week, we must try as much as we can to evaluate and calibrate the way we live as Christians, especially the way we both privately and publicly live out our unique vocations.  We are the living examples of Christ’s goodness if only we lend him our bodies to demonstrate His Passion, Death, and Resurrection. In other words, we need always and everywhere to supplant our self-centered wills, which always lead us to many unwanted troubles, by allowing God’s will be done in our lives even if it becomes so unbearable to us.
When we embrace the pain and suffering we endure in practicing humility and obedience, we shall truly know and understand the full meaning of religion, for we shall be full of trust in the Lord with all its goodness.  Just a reminder: there was no Resurrection without Crucifixion; there is no harvesting without planting; there is no paycheck without working; and there is no gain without suffering.  By our perseverance in Christ, we shall succeed one day by his grace.

 

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The Fifth Sunday of Lent -A

  • Written by Fr. Emmanuel Famiyeh

(Ezekiel 37: 12-14     Romans 8: 8-11     John 11: 1-45)

Holy Week is just a week from this weekend when we shall recall the events that have brought us so much goodness of God that we cannot but thank Him for all his mercy and compassion. At the same time, we increase our hope in the life of the world to come, especially as we believe in the resurrection of the body as Christ has given us the recipe for that reality.
The thought of death sends sharp shivers through our bodies for we do not know what lies beyond death. It was, it is, and it will be for this reason that most of us, if not all us, give in so easily to the quest to satisfy the flesh in favor of the spirit. But this kind of an outlook has its final destiny in the grave. Jesus would rise from the tomb so as to transform our outlook to go beyond the grave as the grave would be found empty. Truly, this is the core message and the summary of the New Testament. The Kerygmatic proclamation of the Death, Resurrection, and the Second Coming of Christ is to reassure us of a brighter future in the Lord as we live with full trust in the Lord in order to begin our METANOIA, a journey of total conversion from a reliance of one’s own sinful self to a reliance on the grace of God.

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The Fourth Sunday of Lent -A

  • Written by Fr. Emmanuel Famiyeh

(1st Samuel 16: 1, 6-7, 10-13     Ephesians 5: 8-14     John 9: 1-41)

 

Blindness causes so much darkness in one’s life because sight is light for the body, guiding it through rough terrains. Similarly, spiritual blindness creates chaos in our lives since we find it difficult to navigate our way; we become a moving vehicle, so to speak, through the thickest of darkness.
Either a genuine guide or a remedy for the blindness is needed to help us see better in order to navigate our ways through any terrain. The genuine guide or remedy must be potentially efficacious. We just have to trust and use it to get the benefit. This is what the various Sacraments are; they are grace-filled actions meant to be used to activate the gift of faith in us for our holiness and salvations, as we walk with good sights in the Light of Christ.
Baptism and Confirmation offer us new sight and guide to walk in light. Holy Orders and Holy Matrimony offer us the light equipment needed for the walk so that others may follow us in the light. The Sacraments of Holy Eucharist, Reconciliation, and Anointing of the sick restore our lights when they become defective because of our weaknesses. Trust in the Lord of the Sacraments and walk in his Light!

 

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First Communion Mass Times

  • Written by Denise Cook

St. Joseph-

Easter Sunday 9am

April 27th First Holy Communion~Mass 10am

May 3-4/May 10/11   regular Mass schedule

 

St. Kevin-

Easter Sunday 9am

April 27 10am

May 4th First Holy Communion~Mass 10am

May 10 4pm

 

Immaculate Conception-

Easter Sunday 9am

April 27 10am

May 4 10am

May 11th First Holy Communion~Mass 10am

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The Third Sunday of Lent -A

  • Written by Fr. Emmanuel Famiyeh

 

(Exodus 17: 3-7     Romans 5: 1-2, 5-8     John 4: 5-42)
As we journey through Lent as a kind of a life in the wilderness searching for sustenance, we must realize that it is only God our Creator who can give us all that we need. Though we may deem the dryness and emptiness of our lives as a rejection by our loving God, it is the otherwise that prevails as true: God really loves and respects us as his mortal humble creatures in need of his abiding graces and presence; we fall away from God because of our arrogance which prevents us to acknowledge that we are just humus without the breath of God. In fact, to acknowledge that we are human implies the need for us to be humble in the presence of God begging for his helps.
Humility, or being humus, is what makes us come before the Lord with all our needs begging for his love, mercy and compassion. This is what prayer is all about. But unfortunately some of us still hold on to our arrogant weak selfish nature and avoid prayer. Avoiding prayer will keep us in the wilderness still searching for peace, comfort and solace. But why do we have to subject ourselves to such unnecessary punishment when we have all the provisions we need in Christ? Why can we not put our trust in him and be fully satisfied in this valley of tears so that we might one day experience the fulfillment of all human desires in heaven? God is waiting for us to come to him with all our needs and wants; it takes only daily prayers which cost us nothing but gain us everything to make the communication link with God a possibility. Remember, we are the sheep of God’s flock in need of Him as our Shepherd.

 

 

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The Second Sunday of Lent -A

  • Written by Fr. Emmanuel Famiyeh

(Genesis 12: 1-4     2 Timothy 1: 8-10     Matthew 17: 1-9)

 

Some of us consider Lent as a nuisance because the Church forces us to undergo some unnecessary mortification of the flesh. But, this should not be the case at all; Lent should be seen as a blessing to accentuate what we should actually do as a daily spiritual exercise which we rather ignore.
In Baptism, we all die with Christ so as to rise with him in his glorious Resurrection. Dying with Christ implies living his holy life. Living his holy life demands us to give up our comfort zone that leads to a life of arrogance, which is a perfect recipe for sin since it seeks not the grace of God.
We all know that our mortal bodies will one day lie in death so that a new one in the order of Christ is given us. But if we spend so much time, energy and resources to keep the mortal body in a perfect shape and form, would it not be a better and smarter move to spend a similar strength to make the soul healthy as well? This smarter choice is what Lent offers us so that we may carry it out throughout our earthly lives each day. All that we need is to muster courage and strength to believe and trust in the love of God and his ever-abiding presence and grace, even though this might seem as a burden.  We stand to gain so much in going through any exercise of mortification for the sake of the health of our souls.

 

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